Tag Archives: stephanie laurens

Books in April ’13

Hello, sweet readers! It is the end of month, and you know what that means in this blog! YES! You get to hear what I read this month!

It was a rather stressful month, although nowhere near in the scale of February. I handed in my candidate’s essay (can I get a cheer for that?), finished a bunch of school things, and today celebrated Walpurgis Night! I had to leave early though, since I might get called to work tomorrow, but I had a bunch of fun!

Anyway, on to the books now!

 

Stephanie Laurens: The Lady Chosen

Tristan Wemyss, Earl of Trentham, never expected he’d need to wed within a year or forfeit his inheritance. But he is not one to bow to the matchmaking mamas of the ton. No, he will marry a lady of his own choosing. And the lady he chooses is the enchanting neighbor living with her family next door. Miss Leonora Carling has beauty, spirit and passion; unfortunately, matrimony is the last thing on her mind . . .

To Leonora, Tristan’s kisses are oh-so-tempting, but once bitten, forever shy, she has determinedly turned her back on marriage. But Tristan is a seasoned campaigner who will not accept defeat. And when a mysterious man attempts to scare Leonora and her family from their home, Tristan realizes he’s been given the perfect excuse to offer his services–as protector, seducer and, ultimately, husband.

(Goodreads)

The romance parts and the detective parts could have been better blended, I felt, and more carefully balanced: at times it felt like there were two books smashed into one. On the other hand, I really enjoyed the Bastion Club gents, them being fun and attractive to boot ­– quite the perfect heroes for series of romance novels. The heroine Leonoroa, however, annoyed me. Her aversion to marriage was flat and the trauma that lead to it could have been used to a more dramatic effect. In fact, the whole book could have kicked the drama up a notch – but just a notch, mind. Too much drama isn’t good, but a little bit is good. I’m also more partial to public scandal than private ones, as the high society of Regency England loved scandal, and, frankly, public scandal is very difficult to deal with.

Still not a fan of Laurens, but I have another book in the Bastion Club series waiting. I’m eager to see whether it’s better than this first book.

Published: 2003

Pages: 460

 

Scott Lynch: Red Seas Under Red Skies

After a brutal battle with the underworld that nearly destroyed him, Locke and his trusted sidekick, Jean, fled the island city of their birth and landed on the exotic shores of Tal Verrar to nurse their wounds. But even at this westernmost edge of civilization, they can’t rest for long—and are soon back to what they do best: stealing from the undeserving rich and pocketing the proceeds for themselves.

This time, however, they have targeted the grandest prize of all: the Sinspire, the most exclusive and heavily guarded gambling house in the world. Its nine floors attract the wealthiest clientele—and to rise to the top, one must impress with good credit, amusing behavior… and excruciatingly impeccable play. For there is one cardinal rule, enforced by Requin, the house’s cold-blooded master: it is death to cheat at any game at the Sinspire.

Brazenly undeterred, Locke and Jean have orchestrated an elaborate plan to lie, trick, and swindle their way up the nine floors… straight to Requin’s teeming vault. Under the cloak of false identities, they meticulously make their climb—until they are closer to the spoils than ever.

But someone in Tal Verrar has uncovered the duo’s secret. Someone from their past who has every intention of making the impudent criminals pay for their sins. Now it will take every ounce of cunning to save their mercenary souls. And even that may not be enough…

(Goodreads)

Once again, I reread this book. I do these things – I have already read Lies this year, and there is to be a read-along on tumblr in the summer, which means I’ll be reading both books soon, and I just don’t like the idea of having read RSURS fewer times. So there. Now there is balance in the world!

As usual, Red Seas is wonderful. It makes me grin and squeal and sigh and shout and cry. So very wonderful!

Published: 2007

Pages: 630

 

Brandon Sanderson: Warbreaker

T’Telir, capital of Hallandren, is a colorful city by the sea where gaily dressed crowds bustle through sunny streets and worship heroes who have been reborn as gods. Ruled by the silent, mysterious God King, the pantheon is nourished by offerings of Breath, the life force that keeps them alive and youthful.

Exiled in Idris, the former royal family reluctantly betrothed a princess to the God King. Arriving in T’Telir, she finds both the city and the marriage are not at all what she expected. Her only ally is Lightsong, a god who is skeptical of his own divinity, who fears that war with Idris is inevitable.

Meanwhile, another new arrival in T’Telir, one who bears the sentient sword Nightblood, makes cunning plans based on the unique magic of Hallandren, which uses color to focus the power of the Breath – plans that could change the world.

(Tor paperback back cover)

Took the first opportunity to read my wonderful find of a free book. And boy, did I love it! Sanderson is truly a brilliant world-builder. While his style is not something that would have me devour his books, I still find myself up at night reading just one more chapter. It happened with Warbreaker, as it did with the Mistborn trilogy.

The characters were wonderful. With Sanderson, you can trust no one is unimportant or a mere tool with no personality. They are all human, all believable, and no one goes without a part in the story. And there’s always another bloody secret. I just love that. I swear, I lost bunches and bunches of hair because I tore it out in frustration when I realised I didn’t see something coming, although I should have. It’s amazing.

Warbreaker got me out of a period of avoiding fantasy. I cannot tell you how relieving that is. It’s been a while since I’ve read any unfamiliar fantasy and I’ve had trouble immersing. It’s probably because my mind has constantly been on school, but now I could really lose myself into T’Telir and forget about work for a while.

You really should read Warbreaker if you haven’t. It is a standalone, it is wonderful, it is engaging, and it is a thrill. I loved all the characters, I loved the city, I loved the system of magic (explained very simply and clearly, which I thoroughly appreciate), and I’m rearing to read more Sanderson now. Elantis, Alloy of Law and Way of Kings, here I come!

Warning: I cried in the end. A lot. So prepare your poor feelings and have tissues at hand.

Published: 2009

Pages: 652 (Tor 2010 paperback)

 

Sean Thomas Russell: Under Enemy Colours

1793: the thunder of cannon fire echoes across the English Channel, chilling the stoutest hearts…

The French Revolutionary War threatens to wreak havoc across the English Channel. As the Royal Navy mobilizes its fleet, the frigate HMS Themis is ordered to patrol French coastal waters.

On deck is young Lieutenant Charles Hayden. With an English father and a French mother, he must earn the trust of officers and men. Now he finds himself acting as a bulwark between the Themis’s tyrannical Captain Hart and the mutinous crew. As disaffection turns to violence, Hayden is torn between honour, duty and saving his ship…

A sweeping and epic maritime adventure set during the momentous first clashes of the Napoleonic Wars, Under Enemy Colours is a masterpiece in the tradition of Patrick O’Brian and Bernard Cornwell.

(Penguin 2007 paperback back cover)

A friend recommended this book to me a couple of years ago, when my historical interest circled around Admiral Nelson and the naval part of Napoleonic Wars. Although my interests have no adjusted themselves slightly differently, I still wanted to read this one.

It was alright. I’m not familiar with sailing by any measure, and, quite honestly, if I hadn’t read Lynch’s Red Seas Under Red Skies for landlubber explanations for how a ship works I don’t know how I would have fared. It’s not too bad in terms of vocabulary, so don’t let that turn you away from the book – it’s manageable and some things do get explained (but not so many as would make the reader feel they’re being patronised, a thing that is very good in my books).

I would have wished for even more clashes between Hayden and Hart, but I’m sure they’ve been carefully chosen in order to keep things reasonable at the end of the book. What is of course interesting in the setting of the book is Hayden’s parentage: being half French and half English was not easy during the wars. That is used to nice effect. My favourite character, though, was young Mr Wickham, whose name offended my Janeite mind at first, but he grows on you very quickly.

Under Enemy Colours is part of a series, and I think I may read the sequel, A Battle Won. Nice books if you’re into ships and the Napoleonic Wars but don’t care for info dumps.

Published: 2007

Pages: 527

 

Agatha Christie: Murder Is Easy

Luke Fitzwilliam does not believe Miss Pinkerton’s wild allegation that a multiple murderer is at work in the quiet English village of Wychwood and that her local doctor is next in line.

But within hours, Miss Pinkerton has been killed in a hit-and-run car accident. Mere coincidence? Luke is inclined to think so–until he reads in the Times of the unexpected demise of Wychwood’s Dr. Humbleby…

(Goodreads)

This is only the second Christie I have read, and I have seen the film version just very recently. Therefore, this was a bit of an unfortunate choice of reading, considering I knew full well the identity of the murderer – but it was engaging nonetheless, not least because I know the adaptation rather well and could easily trace the changes.

I must say the murderer’s motive in the book felt much more satisfactory in the book than in the adaptation, although the latter was undeniably more dramatic. It did change my view of the character though, and while the film version made them more human I do understand the book character better.

I’ll be posting more about my relationship to Christie shortly, as I’m thinking of making her my summer project. You know, to keep the little grey cells working! Summer vacation means no university work, but I certainly don’t want it to mean no academic pursuits!

Published:1939

Pages: 254 (Harper Collins 2010 facsimile edition for the Crime Club)

 

P.G. Wodehouse: Much Obliged, Jeeves

When the infamous book, kept under lock and key at the Junior Ganymede Club goes missing it is up to the imperturbable Jeeves to save the assorted reputations of all those whose private lives are detailed within it. Many people including Bertie Wooster, rescued from imminent marriage, and even Augustus the cat have cause to be much obliged to Jeeves.

(Vintage 1990 edition back cover)

I come from a family who reads Wodehouse, so it is with some embarrassment that I admit how few of them I’ve read myself. They are always delightful: Wodehouse’s language is a treat, although as an EFL student I don’t always quite understand all the gags. In this one, I felt some recurring jokes were used a little too frequently, but then again, I did read this is one day and therefore was more inclined to notice these repetitions. Had I taken my time, they probably wouldn’t have bothered me at all.

Published: 1971

Pages: 192 (Vintage 1990 edition)

 

Books bought:

I ordered three books, and so far have received one in tact (Trollope’s The Way We Live Now) and another one damaged (David Copperfield; the replacement should arrive any day now). King of Thorns hasn’t arrived yet. I also bought Gaskell’s Cranford since it was on sale, and found yet another book on the recycling shelf, this time at the Department of Modern Languages at uni. That book was Elizabeth Bear’s All the Windwracked Stars. I will post a picture of all these once I get everything gathered together!

Currently reading:

Redshirts by John Scalzi (and boy am I loving it!)

 

That’s it for April! I don’t start doing regular shifts at work until June, so I hope May will be filled with books! I’m very much behind compared to last year, by some ten books, but then again, I knew this year would be busy and that there wouldn’t be as much time to read…

Anyway. I’m so happy spring is here and that school is ending!

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Books in March

Guess why I love March? Because it’s the first spring month! Not that it hasn’t snowed and been cold, but the sun is slowly starting to show her face for more significant amounts of time per day. Things get easier now that we get some light every day. And reading is of course much more pleasant in natural light.

Neil Gaiman: American Gods

It was high time for me to read this book. I’ve been meaning to do it for years, even bought it last year, and now I’ve finally done it!

After three years in prison, Shadow has done his time. But as the days, then the hours, then the minutes, then the seconds until his release tick away, he can feel a storm building. Two days before he gets out, his wife Laura dies in a mysterious car crash, in apparently adulterous circumstances. Dazed, Shadow travels home, only to encounter the bizarre Mr. Wednesday claiming to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god and the king of America. Together they embark on a very strange journey across the States, along the way solving the murders which have occurred every winter in one small American town. But they are being pursued by someone with whom Shadow must make his peace… Disturbing, gripping and profoundly strange, Neil Gaiman’s epic new novel sees him on the road to finding the soul of America.

(Goodreads)

I admit I was slightly disappointed. I’ve heard so much good about the book, so many of my friends claim it one of the best things they have ever read, and all this praise has obviously raised my expectations too high.

Don’t misundertand: it is a good book. It is one of those reads you get to piece together as you go on, and it can be a lot of fun. There are great themes like belief, remembering your roots and sacrifice. There are great characters you grow to like. But somehow I find it hard to be excited. I was not at the edge of my seat. I did not stay up to the wee hours of the morning because I just had to read another chapter. It didn’t suck me in like I wanted it to.

* cue lych mob of Gaiman fans *

Don’t anyone be discouraged by what I have said. Neil Gaiman is not considered among the best fantasy authors of our time, nor, I am sure, is American Gods considered his best work, for nothing. It is safe to say that it’s me, not him.

Published: William Morrow 2001

Pages: 635 (Headline Review 2005 edition)

Gregory Maguire: Out of Oz

I read the first three books in the Wicked Years series a couple of years ago, when Wicked the musical was coming to Helsinki and a friend of mine wanted to see it. He had already read the books, so he made me do that too – and I’m not complaining. I had been read the Wizard of Oz when I was a kid, although the book got lost and I never got to know how it ended, and I had not seen the movie. I think this has been an interesting order to learn about the story: I feel such great sympathy towards Elphaba – the Wicked Witch of the West – that I almost cried when she died in the movie and everyone was so happy.

The marvelous land of Oz is knotted with social unrest: The Emerald City is mounting an invasion of Munchkinland, Glinda is under house arrest, and the Cowardly Lion is on the run from the law. And look who’s knocking at the door. It’s none other than Dorothy. Yes, that Dorothy.

Amid all this chaos, Elphaba’s granddaughter, the tiny green baby born at the close of Son of a Witch, has come of age. Now, Rain will take up her broom in an Oz wracked by war.

(Goodreads)

I suppose I liked the book. It was slow at times almost to the point I thought I couldn’t finish, but then the action picked up again and I managed over a hundred pages without even noticing. We meet a whole lot of familiar characters, and even though I survived this read without having to re-read the three first ones, a little repetition would not have hurt. Fortunately, Maguire has taken the time between the publishing A Lion Among Men and Out of Oz to consideration and provided the readers with little family trees, timelines and summaries of previous events in the beginning of the book. In general it’s a nice book, but mostly driven by the reader’s wish to see how things end – will Shell Thropp be overthrown? What happened to Liir? To Glinda? Personally I found Liir’s daughter Rain extremely annoying for the most part of the book, so be warned.

Those who have seen/heard the music of the Broadway soundtrack can also amuse themselves spotting references to the lyrics. I found a few, a couple of them so glaring I had to put the book down for some time to let out some steam.

Published: William Morrow 2011

Pages: 578 (Headline Review 2011 edition)

Suzanne Collins: Catching Fire & Mockingjay

Of these books I won’t provide summaries, in case someone has not read the first one. Say no to spoiling!

I see very little point discussing these books completely separately, so here we go. I have heard people say that Catching Fire is the weakest book in the series, and some people say Mockingjay is the weakest. I’m inclined to think the former – Catching Fire feels like a filler between the basic construction of the plot and the real action that then takes place in Mockingjay. This is not to say it’s a bad book! I ate it up the in much the same way I did The Hunger Games. There are more characters introduced, and several of them are more interesting than the ones in the love triangle.

The way Collins handled said triangle is nice and subtle, and even though I admit I knew how it would end around the time I started Mockingjay, I could not be sure how we could get to that situation. On reflection, I also like the end of the serious extremely well, although I can see it might have disappointed a certain type of reader. To me it was believable and in a way suitably open – there’s a lot left unexplained.

I doubt I’ll reread this series (at least no time soon), but it’s great entertainment with an important message. It’s a pity Twilight took over the world instead of The Hunger Games (although now that the movie is out there is hope) – I would rather have teens reading about fighting an unfair and cruel system than about a very unhealthy relationship. (And Hunger Games is better written, too.)

Published: Scholastic 2009/2010

Pages: 391/390

Richard Morgan: Steel Remains

Ringil, the hero of the bloody slaughter at Gallows Gap is a legend to all who don’t know him and a twisted degenerate to those that do. A veteren of the wars against the lizards he makes a living from telling credulous travellers of his exploits. Until one day he is pulled away from his life and into the depths of the Empire’s slave trade. Where he will discover a secret infinitely more frightening than the trade in lives…

Archeth – pragmatist, cynic and engineer, the last of her race – is called from her work at the whim of the most powerful man in the Empire and sent to its farthest reaches to investigate a demonic incursion against the Empire’s borders.

Egar Dragonbane, steppe-nomad, one-time fighter for the Empire finds himself entangled in a small-town battle between common sense and religious fervour. But out in the wider world there is something on the move far more alien than any of his tribe’s petty gods.

Anti-social, anti-heroic, and decidedly irritated, all three of them are about to be sent unwillingly forth into a vicious, vigorous and thoroughly unsuspecting fantasy world. Called upon by an Empire that owes them everything and gave them nothing.

(richardkmorgan.com)

If the violence and sex in George R R Martin’s books offend you, or you are confused by the time jumping in The Lies of Locke Lamora, you should probably steer clear from this book.

The beginning is so very promising: it’s funny, quirky and exciting – but the fun stops pretty much there. The things introduced are left to the beginning and not returned to, not even in the end. I had great trouble remembering any other names than those of three protagonists – more or less staying in their own chapters – and was constantly confused as to who was who. The timelines were confusing for the most part, and the basic plot evaded me. There were aspects I liked, too – the beginning and the ending, the storylines that in the end intertwine – but they were pretty much killed by the effort it took me to get through these three and a half hundred pages. I even contemplated abandoning it around halfway, but decided to go through with it to see if it would get any better. Unfortunately, it didn’t.

I’m rather disappointed – I so wanted to like Richard Morgan. Maybe I’ll give a shot to his SF novels, to see if those are more to my liking.

Published: Gollancz 2008

Pages: 344 (Gollanzc 2008 hardback)

Stephanie Laurens: The Promise in a Kiss

When a handsome man literally falls at her feet while she’s walking through a moonlit convent courtyard, Helena knows he must be there for a scandalous liaison. Yet she keeps his presence a secret from the questioning nuns – and for her silence the stranger rewards her with an enticing, unforgettable kiss. What Helena does not know is that her wild Englishman is Sebastian Cynster, Duke of St. Ives.

Seven years later, Sebastian spies Helena from across a crowded ballroom. This heiress is dazzling London society with her wit and beauty, tantalising all the eligible men with the prospect of taking her hand in marriage. But Helena is not looking for just any husband. She wants an equal, a challenge – someone who can live up to the promise of that delicious, never-forgotten kiss.

(back cover of Piatkus paperback 2010)

I’d previously read only one book by Stephanie Laurens, and wasn’t much impressed by it. A couple of weeks ago, however, I got into this extensive Regency kick, and because of some decisions I have made I picked up this book along with another Regency Romance.

This one is part of the Cynster family saga. In Goodreads it has been listed as part 7.5, and in the story’s timeline it is the first one: these are the parents/grandparents of the Cynster family that is described in the series.

The Promise in a Kiss is not at all bad, as far as Regency Romances go. I don’t usually care for sex in Regencies, but here Laurens manages to handle it in a way that didn’t really bother me. (Although I wish she would not have referred to the male organ as a “staff”. It was hilarious, and I’m not at all sure that scene was supposed to be funny…)

Otherwise I have very little to complain about. As a personal preference I would have liked to see more dancing and carriages and less strolling, but for each their own. Helena’s husband hunting is fun for a while, and it would remain so, if she would seriously entertain any other possibilities than monsieur le duc. I like both of the main characters well enough, but even better is the villain of the story, Helena’s guardian Fabien. Some minor characters were treated with little care where I would have liked to know what came of them.

As you can see from the summary, the plot is very conventional, and it is indeed treated with more or less conventional means. The romance itself is very sweet.

There is also a duel of swords in a gallery at night. If that is not epic, I don’t know what is.

Published: Avon Books 2001

Pages: 377 (Piatkus 2010 edition)

I also bought a bunch of books this month!

The treasure of the pile is the Finnish translation of Georgette Heyer’s Devil’s Cub. I got it cheap from an Internet auction – I’m excited to see how one does Regency in Finnish! (The title translates back to The Devil Falls in Love – I don’t find that as much fun as the original title, but I suppose it does the job. Rather unimaginative, though.)

Currently reading:

  • Scott Lynch: The Lies of Locke Lamora (Duh!)
  • Mary Balogh: First Comes Marriage (Yes, yet another Regency…)
  • Pamela Regis: A Natural History of the Romance Novel (Highly interesting!)

So on to April! A month and a half of school to go until summer! Yay for summer!

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