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The 2012 Anticipation

New year, new books! This is the first year when I am actually aware of the books that are coming out, and although my anticipation list is not the longest possible I am very excited about the books on it.

Here they are, in release order (most release dates are from http://en.risingshadow.net/):

Saladin Ahmed: The Throne of the Crescent Moon (February 2nd)

This book seems so very promising it is hard not to want to read it! The first chapter is very promising – you can read it here: http://www.saladinahmed.com/wordpress/2011/10/28/throne-of-the-crescent-moon-chapter-one/

The book speaks for itself, I think.

Anne Rice: The Wolf Gift (February 14th)

When I started high school, I found Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles (you know – Interview with the Vampire, Vampire Lestat, Queen of the Damned…). And now she has finally written a novel about werewolves! I am currently plotting the fastest way of acquiring the book.

Douglas Hulick: Sworn in Steel (April)

Even though the first book in the Tales of the Kin series, Among Thieves, did not pull my heartstrings like I had expected it to do, I am curious about the second instalment. I expect to get more into Drothe’s world, although I have a feeling this will be on my list for light summer reading.

Sam Sykes: The Skybound Sea (April)

I have yet to read the second book in this trilogy, but I nonetheless anticipate this last one. The first book, Tome of the Undergates, got better the farther you got, and I have a hope that this trend will continue throughout the series – which, of course, would mean that Skybound Sea would be the best one. I will have to make an effort to get my hands on Black Halo (Aeon’s Gate #2) before this one comes out.

Mark Lawrence: King of Thorns (August)

The second on my Most Exciting list is this book, the second book in the Broken Empire trilogy. Prince of Thorns surprised me with its pull, so it was a relief to find out the next instalment in the series was not too far a wait away.

Hannu Rajaniemi: The Fractal Prince (September)

What can I say? The Quantum Thief was the first sci-fi book I had read in years, and I liked it more than I ever thought I would, so I am excited for the next book in the trilogy!

Scott Lynch: Republic of Thieves (October)

This is absolutely my number one anticipation book. The release date has been pushed back several times due to all sorts of difficulties, but I remain hopeful. I decided some time ago to do my utmost not to spoil myself, which has been a little difficult since the blurb is out as well as the prologue, of which I read about half before I decided I would much rather know nothing about the book before actually starting to read it.

This is not a multitude of books, but I find this soothing – the fewer books I anticipate, the bigger percentage of them it is possible for me to buy. That, if anything, is a happy thought!

I will, as usual, return at the end of the month. Until then, keep turning those pages!

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Great Is the Art of Beginning

The beginning is the most important part of a book. It needs to captivate the reader, make them want to know more, go forward, find out. I’ve fallen into the habit of picking up an interesting-looking book at the bookstore and, instead of reading the blurb, turning to the first page. If there is a prologue, I will also see how the first actually chapter begins.

Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. In any case, I thought I would gather here some great beginnings of books I have read (and own, since quoting becomes harder when you don’t have the material at hand). Some are just the first sentence, some the first paragraph. Some are from prologues, some from first chapters.

“I am the Vampire Lestat. I’m immortal. More or less. The light of the sun, the sustained heat of an intense fire – these things might destroy me. But then again, they might not.”

–       The Vampire Lestat by Anne Rice

“In the land of Ingary, where such things as seven-league boots and cloaks of invisibility really exist, it is quite a misfortune to be born the eldest of three. Everyone knows you are the one who will fail first, and worst, if the three of you set out to seek your fortunes.”

–       Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

“Harry Potter was a highly unusual boy in many ways. For one thing, he hated the summer holidays more than any other time of year. For another, he really wanted to do his homework, but was forced to do it in secret, in the dead of night. And he also happened to be a wizard.”

–       Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling

“Contrary to whatever stories and songs there may be about the subject, there are only a handful of respectable things a man can do after he picks up a sword.”

–       Tome of the Undergates by Sam Sykes

“Ravens! Always the ravens. They settled on the gables of the church even before the injured became the dead.”

–       Prince of Thorns by Mark Lawrence

“As always, before the warmind and I shoot each other, I try to make small talk.”

–       The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi

“At the height of the long wet summer of the Seventy-Seventh Year of Sendovani, the Thiefmaker of Camorr paid a sudden and unannounced visit to the Eyeless Priest at the Temple of Perelandro, desperately hoping to sell him the Lamora boy.”

–       The Lies of Locke Lamora b Scott Lynch

“The game was Carousel Hazard, the stakes were roughly half of all the wealth they commanded in the entire world, and the plain truth was that Locke Lamora and Jean Tannen were getting beaten like a pair of dusty carpets.”

–       Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch

All of these are excellent books, and if any of the beginning appealed to you, I recommend from my heart that you read the book it is from.

I will return at the end of the month!

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