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Books in May ’14

May is gone, and I’m late with this post due to a family thing yesterday and my computer refusing to work after it was over. So let’s not draw this out – here be the books!

 

Mary Robinette Kowal: Without A Summer

 

Up-and-coming fantasist Mary Robinette Kowal enchanted fans with award-winning short stories and beloved novels featuring Regency pair Jane and David Vincent. In Without A Summer, the master glamourists return home, but in a world where magic is real, nothing – not even the domestic sphere – is quite what it seems.

Jane and Vincent go to Long Parkmeade to spend time with Jane’s family, but quickly turn restless. The year is unseasonably cold. No one wants to be outside, and Mr. Ellsworth is concerned by the harvest, since a bad one may imperil Melody’s dowry. And Melody has concerns of her own, given the inadequate selection of eligible bachelors. When Jane and Vincent receive a commission from a prominent family in London, they decide to take it, and take Melody with them. They hope the change of scenery will do her good and her marriage prospects – and mood – will be brighter in London.

Once there, talk is of nothing but the crop failures caused by the cold and the increased unemployment of the coldmongers, which have provoked riots in several cities to the north. With each passing day, it’s more difficult to avoid getting embroiled in the intrigue, none of which really helps Melody’s chances for romance. It’s not long before Jane and Vincent realize that in addition to getting Melody to the church on time, they must take on one small task: solving a crisis of international proportions.

(Back cover of the Tor paperback)

Some of you may remember that Shades of Milk and Honey was my WOW book of last year. I loved it, and I loved Glamour in Glass – and Without A Summer continues that line. I think it better than it’s predecessor, vastly intriguing and oh so pleasant to read! Kowal’s period detail is wonderful and reading her you may trust you are in good hands. I very warmly recommend this series! It is magic mixed with history and, although light in style, takes on many important issues of the family circle and doesn’t shy even from the most difficult of topics. Janeites will also recognise the copious parallels to Emma!

This is one of my favourite series, and this book is excellent. I’m very much looking forward to getting my hands on the next instalment, Valour and Vanity!

Published: 2013

Pages: 349

 

Den Patrick: The Boy with the Porcelain Blade

 

Lucien di Fontein has grown up an outsider; one of the Orfano, the deformed of the Kingdom of Landfall. He is lonely, tormented by his difference and a pawn in a political game. The reclusive king and his majordomo rule Landfall from the vast castle of Demesne, but the walls are no barrier to darkness from without. Or within.

Landfall is a harsh world of secrets and rivalries, where whispers are as lethal as blades, where control is fragile and the peace waits to be broken. Lucien will have to rely on more than just his blade to protect the ones he loves.

Den Patrick’s richly imagined high fantasy introduces a memorable new hero. His is a story that will delight those who love Locke Lamora and Titus Groan alike.

(Back cover of Gollancz trade paperback 2014)

Yes, even I sometimes manage to read something the same year it comes out. What did you expect? Locke Lamora has been mentioned, political intrigue promised, and a fantastic title presented.

As a whole, I find this book rather average. Well, perhaps a little above average. There are some things that bothered me, but also a lot to admire. I shall break this review into bullet points, because I feel that is the clearest way to explain both my qualms and approvals.

Pros:

  • Despite being numerous, fight scenes do not get boring; very alive, very well described
  • The worldbuilding works well, although it took me a while to catch on. This is likely more me than the book, as I tend to skip scenery.
  • When the dialogue is witty, it really is witty! And it’s good in general.

 

Cons:

  • Some unnecessary repetition of details; they get underlined but aren’t all that significant.
  • I’m not too happy with the female characters. This gets a bit better towards the end, but the inaction and the very traditional roles they’re cast in grates.
  • Lucien spends a lot of time sleeping or unconscious; surely there are other wise of transitioning from one scene to another?
  • So. Many. Fires.

 

In general, I think it’s a nice, enjoyable book. I also think that Patrick has a lot of potential, which he will reach through more experience; this reads very much like a first novel. I will also mention that this edition could have used another round of proofreading, as there was a lot of punctuation missing and a few typos. The latter didn’t bother me as much as the former.

I will definitely read the next one as well, because I think there’s something here. It just needs some improvement to really snare me.

Published: 2014

Pages: 321

 

Scott Lynch: The Republic of Thieves

 

I will leave out the blurb and, indeed, a review. This was my third reading and it was conducted mostly to take notes and to see if there was anything I missed earlier.

Published: 2013

Pages: 598

 

M. C. Beaton: The Taming of Annabelle

 

From the moment the honey-tressed young Annabelle meets her sister Minerva’s intended, Lord Sylvester, she develops a secret passion for him that obsesses her. Now she is determined to take him away from Minerva – no matter what.

But Annabelle hadn’t reckoned on Lord Sylvester’s best friend, Peter, who falls in love with her and decides to tame her growing passions for the wrong man.

(Back cover of Constable & Robinson paperback)

This is the second book in The Six Sisters series. I hadn’t read Beaton before, but decided to get it from the library when it happened to sit there on the shelf.

Thing is, I’m too old for this book. This would work wonders for a teen reader; it’s quite fun and introduces the Regency period very well, with several rather entertaining explanatory paragraphs here and there. The plot is a bit childish, but so is the main character, and at times Annabelle annoyed me to no end. Peter hardly behaves any less childishly despite being 35 (I think) and that does not quite sit with me.

This book, and I assume the others in the series, could work well as easy introductions to Regency romance. The Taming of Annabelle is fun, but for older readers it may be too shallow. I would say a 13–15-year-old would be more in the target readership, and I would not hesitate to recommend this to someone of that age with an interest in romance.

Published: 1983

Pages: 250

 

Elizabeth Bear: Shoggoths in Bloom

 

Shoggoths in Bloom: A compilation of short science fiction and fantasy from Elizabeth Bear – tales of myth and mythic resonance, fantasies both subtle and epic in tone; hard science fiction and speculations about an unknowable universe. This collection, showcasing Bear’s unique imagination and singular voice, includes her Hugo- and Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award-winning story “Tideline” and Hugo-winning novelette “Shoggoth in Bloom”, as well as an original, never-published story. Recipient of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, a World Fantasy, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick nominee, Bear is one of speculative fiction’s most acclaimed, respected, and prolific authors.

(Back cover of the Prime paperback)

Now, understand that I’m very bad at reading collections of short stories. Very bad. I manage one a year, if I try hard, and it can be slow going without a plot to pull me.

I didn’t have my usual troubles with Shoggoths.

Bear is amazingly versatile in her writing, and I promise you a swoon over how much research has gone into every single story in this collection. I am both enamoured and awed. If you read short story collection this year, read this one.

I cried at the end of the first one. Several made me uncomfortable, in the way good SF should. Two hit me really hard in my current situation in life, and I draw strength from them. And oh, I think I’ve found my favourite short story. Well, a new one for the small list of the ones I love: “The Cold Blacksmith” took me and chewed at my heart and now, days later, I’m still not over it.

Published: 2011

Pages: 329 (20 short stories)

 

Julia Quinn: Just Like Heaven

Honoria Smythe-Smith, the youngest daughter of the eldest son of the Earl of Winstead, plays the violin in the annual musicale performed by the Smythe-Smith quartet. She’s well aware that they are dreadful but she’s the sort who figures that nothing good will come of being mortified, so she puts on a good show and laughs about it.

Marcus Holroyd is the best friend of Honoria’s brother Daniel, who lives in exile. Marcus has promised to watch out for Honoria, but he faces a challenge when she sets off for Cambridge determined to marry by the end of the season. She’s got her eye on the only unmarried Bridgerton, who’s a bit wet behind the ears. When her advances are spurned, can Marcus swoop in and steal her heart in time for the musicale?

(Back cover of Piatkus 2011 paperback)

I don’t find the blurb terribly accurate. Just wanted to say that. I also want to say that my primary motive for reading this book is the rather hilarious dedication – “And also for Paul, even though when I went to him for medical advice to save my ailing hero, he replied, ‘He has to die.’”

I’m not particularly fond of this sort of “We have known each other since we were children and I am starting to realise I actually love you” romance. Not that I don’t occasionally enjoy it, but at least at this instance I was not in the mood for it. I also found this book rather flat and it failed to raise any particular feelings. It served its purpose of something light and quick to read, but apart from that, hardly memorable.

Published: 2011

Pages: 374

 

Mary Balogh: The Proposal

 

Lady Gwendoline Muir has experienced her fair share of tragedies in her short life: she lost her husband to a freak accident, and developed a limp after falling from horseback. Still young, Gwen is sure that she’s done with love, and that she will never be married again.

Gwen tries to be content with her life as it is, and to live through the marriages of her brother and her cousin and best friend, Viscountess Ravensburg. She’s happy for them, and for years that is enough for her… until she meets Lord Trentham – a man who returned from the Peninsular War a hero, but is unable to escape the bite of his survivor’s guilt. For he might just be the man who can convince her to believe in second chances.

(Back cover of Piatkus 2012 paperback)

Now we’re talking. I have been eager to start the Survivors’ Club series, of which this one is the first. Balogh writes very believable and mature characters and does it with such certainty that it is hard not to fall in with them – and indeed, why would you even want to avoid that? Some of you know of my penchant for wounded heroes, and that is exactly what this book, along with the rest of the series, provides. Trentham is particularly interesting for his utter bluntness; I don’t think I’ve read a Regency romance where sex is so explicitly discussed (never crudely, though – Balogh is never crude).

The charm of this book is mainly in the characters. When it comes to plot, it’s rather straightforward and un-dramatic, which I feel speaks of Balogh’s skill as a writer: the lack of drama does not diminish the experience or slow the reading, quite the opposite. There was a little too much retelling of moments from another point of view, but I hope that is only a lapse in this book and won’t occur in the rest of the series, the next of which I have waiting.

Published: 2012

Pages: 309

 

Fyodor Dostoyevsky: The Idiot

 Returning to Russia from a sanitarium in Switzerland, the Christ-like epileptic Prince Myshkin finds himself enmeshed in a tangle of love, torn between two women—the notorious kept woman Nastasya and the pure Aglaia—both involved, in turn, with the corrupt, money-hungry Ganya. In the end, Myshkin’s honesty, goodness, and integrity are shown to be unequal to the moral emptiness of those around him.

(Goodreads)

Not too fond of this one. It is obvious that Dostoyevsky was in need of money while writing this, and the serialisation is so obvious it was at times painfully dull going – there is a confession latter that lasts for three chapters (some 40 pages) and it largely unrelated to the plot. However, some of the characters – particularly Nastasja Filippovna and Rogozin (I’m using the Finnish version of the names) – were very interesting, and the last few chapters are excellent in their dramatic flair, although I wouldn’t say they are worth reading the whole thing. However, I’m glad I’ve read it and can now move the next Dostoyevsky to my more immediate list.

Published: 1868

Translation: Olli Kuukasjärvi

Pages: 829

 

Alexander Pushkin: Eugene Onegin

 

Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in imperial Russia during the 1820s, Pushkin’s novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men – Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself – and the fates and affections of three women – Tatyana the provincial beauty, her sister Olga, and Pushkin’s mercurial Muse. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it also portrays a large cast of other characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin’s own favourite work, and it shows him attempting to transform himself from romantic poet into realistic novelist.

(Goodreads)

Now this was very much my thing! I started reading a bit sceptically, although I’ve long wanted to read this, and my, it was an absolute pleasure! Pushkin is much more fun than I’d expected, I wasn’t bored by his nature descriptions at all, he is very intertextual, and there is some damn good drama, although some of the motivations elude me. Nonetheless, very very good!

Published: 1823–31

Translation: Lauri Kemiläinen 1935

Pages: 242

 

Currently reading:
Andrei Belyi: Peterburg

That’s it for May!

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2013 in Books

2014 has begun, and that means it’s time to look at stuff I read last year!

BOOKS READ 2013

1. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The Return of Sherlock Holmes
2. Stephen Fry: Moab Is My Washpot
3. Mary Balogh: Dark Angel/Lord Carew’s Bride
4. J.R.R. Tolkien: Silmarillion
5. Scott Lynch: The Lies of Locke Lamora x2
6. Georgette Heyer: Pistols for Two
7. Anne Brontë: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
8. Toby Barlow: Sharp Teeth
9. John Mullan: What Matters in Jane Austen? Twenty Crucial Puzzles Solved
10.  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The Sign of Four
11.  Lucy Worsley: Courtiers – The Secret History of the Georgian Court
12.  John Fowles: The French Lieutenant’s Woman
13.  Lisa Kleypas: Love in the Afternoon
14.  Peter Ackroyd: The Fall of Troy
15.  Toni Morrison: Beloved
16.  Julia Quinn: Splendid
17.  Julia Quinn: Dancing at Midnight
18.  Stephanie Laurens: The Lady Chosen
19.  Scott Lynch: Red Seas Under Red Skies x2
20.  Brandon Sanderson: Warbreaker
21.  Sean Thomas Russell: Under Enemy Colours
22.  Agatha Christie: Murder Is Easy
23.  P. G. Wodehouse: Much Obliged, Jeeves
24.  John Scalzi: Redshirts
25.  Agatha Christie: Elephants Can Remember
26.  Patricia Highsmith: The Talented Mr Ripley
27. Agatha Christie: At Bertram’s Hotel
28.  Gillian Gill: Agatha Christie
29.  Mika Waltari: Tanssi yli hautojen
30.  Mary Balogh: A Summer to Remember
31.  Julia Quinn: An Offer from A Gentleman
32.  Diana Wynne Jones: Charmed Life
33.  Mark Lawrence: King of Thorns
34.  Jonathan L. Howard: Johannes Cabal: The Necromancer
35.  Jonathan L. Howard: Johannes Cabal: The Detective
36.  Torsten Ekman: Aleksanteri I: keisari ja isänmaa
37.  Agatha Christie: Appointment with Death
38. David Lodge: Small World
39.  Agatha Christie: After the Funeral
40.  Georgette Heyer: Bath Tangle
41.  Mary Balogh: The Famous Heroine/The Plumed Bonnet
42.  Jonathan L. Howard: Johannes Cabal: The Fear Institute
43.  Desiree Monet: In His World 1
44.  Jonathan Strahan (edit.): Fearsome Journeys
45.  Mary Robinette Kowal: Shades of Milk and Honey
46.  Mary Robinette Kowal: Glamour in Glass
47.  Colin Dexter: Service of All the Dead
48.  Orson Scott Card: Ender’s Game
49.  Sarah Wendell & Candy Tan: Beyond Heaving Bosoms – The Smart Bitches’ Guide to Romance Novels
50.  Kelly McClymer: The Fairy Tale Bride
51.  Courtney Milan: The Governess Affair
52.  Julia Quinn & Eloisa James & Connie Brockway: The Lady Most Likely
53.  Mary Balogh: The Secret Mistress
54.  Julia Quinn: Minx
55. Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility
56. Jillian Hunter: A Wicked Lord at the Wedding
57. Eloisa James: The Duke Is Mine
58. Mary Balogh: A Christmas Promise
59. Jillian Hunter: The Duchess Diaries
60. Gaelen Foley: My Irresistible Earl
61. Eloisa James: Enchanting Pleasures
62. Mary Balogh: A Precious Jewel
63. Tracy Anne Warren: My Fair Mistress
64. Eloisa James: When the Duke Returns
65. Eloisa James: A Duke of Her Own
66. Shannon Hale: Austenland
67. Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights
68. Ben Aaronovitch: Rivers of London
69. Rainbow Rowell: Fangirl
70. Saladin Ahmed: The Throne of the Crescent Moon
71. Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey
72. Scott Lynch: The Republic of Thieves x2
73. William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet
74. Jo Barrett: Nothing to Recommend Her
75. Beverley Kendall: All’s Fair in Love and Seduction
76. Aileen Fish: His Impassioned Proposal
77. Leigh LaValle: The Misbehaving Marquess
78. Ruth Ann Nordin: The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife
79. Larry D. Benson (edit.): Alliterative Morte Arthure
80. Ann Lethbridge: Wicked Rake, Defiant Mistress
81. Oscar Wilde: Salome
82. Eloisa James: Winning the Wallflower
83. Eloisa James: When Beauty Tamed the Beast
84. John Cleland: Memoirs of Fanny Hill
85. Nathaniel Lee: Lucius Junius Brutus
86. Elizabeth Bear: Dust
87. Mary Elizabeth Braddon: Lady Audley’s Secret
88. Ally Condie: Matched
89. Sherwood Smith: A Posse of Princesses
90. Eloisa James: The Ugly Duchess
91. Tracy Anne Warren: His Favourite Mistress
92. Eloisa James: Midnight Pleasures
93. Tracy Anne Warren: The Accidental Mistress
94. Loretta Chase: Don’t Tempt Me

That’s a rather satisfying list, considering how worried I was that the exchange semester would hold me back. I got through quite a lot of romance in August though, so that sort of balanced out the quieter months – and as you can see, the last couple of weeks of the year were romance-heavy as well. My goal at Goodreads was 70 books, and I’ve clearly over-read it with 94. Some of the titles on the list are novellas and plays so they are shorter, but I decided they count.

Now, let us announce the WOW of the year! To those who don’t know, every year I choose one book that rocked my socks off. The rules are that it cannot be by an author I’ve read before, and it must be the first book by that author I’ve read. Here are the previous WOWs:

2009 – Scott Lynch (The Lies of Locke Lamora)
2010 – Ellen Kushner (Privilege of the Sword)
2011 – Mark Lawrence (Prince of Thorns)
2012 – Sgt Dan Mills (Sniper One)

and for 2013

Mary Robinette Kowal (Shades of Milk and Honey)!

I’d heard about Shades of Milk and Honey here and there, and when I found it and the sequel Glamour in Glass from the book sale at Finncon I decided I might as well give them a go. I read the first page of SoMaH and almost screamed because it was so up my street and no one ever explained how much for me the book was! It’s Regency, it’s romance, it’s a bit mystery, it’s magic, and it’s just amazing. As a Janeite I appreciate all the nods towards Austen’s work, and as a lover of mannerpunk – well. It’s just perfect.

Other books who are on my list for this year’s favourite are John Scalzi’s Redshirts (it took my by surprise and I was very upset after finishing it), Brandon Sanderson’s Warbreaker (it would have been WOW of 2013 had I not read Mistborn a couple of years ago), Peter Ackroyd’s The Fall of Troy (which I liked a lot against all expectations) and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (reading which I put of for years and years).

So I suppose that’s it for 2013! I bought quite a lot of books, among them two copies of Republic of Thieves, lived abroad, met a lot of people, sunk deeper into romance… A lot of good stuff. This year, I’ve set my reading goal to 85 books, to be adjusted as I see how this year unfolds. I also promise to read at least one Russian classic, since I slacked in that respect in 2013 – I haven’t decided which one I want to read, but I think it’s going to be either Brothers Karamazov or Doctor Zhivago. And I also want to reread War and Peace, but that may have to wait.

Blog-wise, my resolution is to return to regular blogging and book reviewing, so keep an eye on this spot!

That’s it from me. Have a really good year 2014, everyone!

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