Operation Classic: Wuthering Heights

I finished it! I finally finished Wuthering Heights! BRING ON ALL THE MOVIE ADAPTATIONS I CAN FINALLY WATCH THEM!

I’m actually glad I haven’t read it before. I started it some years ago, but was put off by Joseph’s dialect which at the time was a tad too challenging for me. And a good thing I put it off because I’m pretty sure I would have missed a whole lot.

What is on the top of my mind at the moment is the way people always talk about Wuthering Heights in terms of a love story. In a way it is, yes, but I did not by any means think much of it. Cathy and Heathcliff barely share any page time.

About halfway through the book I found all the characters massively annoying, particularly either Catherine and Nelly the Narrator. Then I started to appreciate the way Heathcliff is written; he’s really determined to get his revenge on everything and everyone in it and will ruthlessly destroy everything in his way. It’s actually really good. I understand why people like the character.

The character who finally managed to make their way into my heart was Hareton Earnshaw. There’s something there, to make a reference to Disney while wanting to compare Hareton a bit to the Beast. There’s an unrefinement, under which there’s a will to please, and a rather earnest love and loyalty. Yeah, Hareton is my favourite of the characters.

To conclude, I want to mention how much I actually liked this book. I didn’t expect to, but I did. If the narrative technique was the same as employed by Charlotte Brontë, I would say I prefer Wuthering Heights to Jane Eyre, something I didn’t think I would say. Of course, they are very different. What greatly appeals to me in Wuthering Heights is the way a couple’s stubbornness leads to the destruction of the happiness of more or less all. It’s rather beautiful, in its way.

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