Books in November ’12

Hello hello hello hello hello, and welcome, to the – ! Okay too much QI. I apologise.

This has been a measly month when it comes to books. School has been really busy, and I’ve been so lazy to read anything after the Victorian pile we did. Hopefully Christmas holidays will allow me more time to read – I plan to have a whole ten days off school stuff between a Television Studies essay and writing the first draft of my thesis. I have some books I plan to read, but we’ll be seeing about those later.

Anne Rice: The Wolf Gift

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Man or monster?

Anne Rice reinvented the vampire legend. Discover what she’s done with the werewolf myth.

After a brutal attack, Reuben finds himself changing. His hair is longer, his skin is more sensitive and he can hear things he never could before.

Now he must confront the beast within him – or lose himself completely.

(Back cover of Arrow Books edition)

I started reading Anne Rice in the first year of high school, and stopped sometime during the third year. So in a way, starting The Wolf Gift felt a little like coming home. I actually tried to start quite another book, but it didn’t draw me in immediately. Wolf Gift did. And it was such an engaging book I had a hard time putting it down from time to time to attend to school stuff.

Rice doesn’t do to werewolves what she did to vampires, though she brings up a new twist to werewolf lore. But that is something you will have to find out on your own. What you might want to know is that Wolf Gift is not just horror – it’s also a thriller, a philosophical work, and just beautiful prose. It’s not heavy, despite the frequent descriptive bits, and it’s a good one to have with you if you commute. You get easily sucked into the story, and the characters are very likable, although I felt some of them remained somewhat flat. On the other hand, this leaves open the possibility of other books dealing with werewolves. And I would like that very much.

Published: 2012

Pages: 580 (Arrow Books paperback edition)

Toby Barlow: Sharp Teeth

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Reread for the fave post, so you can just click here and read why I love this book to tiny little bits.

Published: Harper Collins 2008

Pages: 313

Jules Verne: The Castle of the Carpathians https://i0.wp.com/i43.tower.com/images/mm100788706/castle-carpathians-jules-verne-paperback-cover-art.jpg

The descriptions of the quaint villagers of Werst, their costumes, manner of living, and belief in the supernatural world would in themselves prove an interesting narrative, but when coupled with the exciting adventures of Nic Deck, the two Counts, the cowardly Doctor, and the beautiful La Stilla, the story is undoubtedly one of the most enchanting ever offered.

This mysterious tale takes place in the area which in just a few years would become known as Dracula’s homeland. Jules Verne has the knack of it. He knows how to make the scientifically romantic story. You might not know what a “nyctalop” was, but if you saw one flapping his wings around the dark fortress in the Carpathians, you would run for it, as did Nic Deck.. Orfanik is head conjurer, and in his trial he explains how he brought into play for a wicked purpose a variety of ingenious inventions.

(Goodreads)

Second book for the fantasy course in Comparative Literature. I wasn’t overly impressed with this one. It starts slowly, switches characters around before we actually meet the main character, and unfortunately the end is rather predictable if you know anything at all about Verne. It wasn’t particularly scary, or even very exciting. The main character’s history was, I grant, interesting, but it is not enough to make me like the book. Translation, of course, can be a part of my disinterest, as the Finnish used was adequate but not exactly compelling.

First published: 1892

Translation: Pentti Kähkönen 1978

Pages: 211 (WSOY 1978 edition)

Kenneth Grahame: The Wind in the Willows

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Meek little Mole, willful Ratty, Badger the perennial bachelor, and petulant Toad. In the almost one hundred years since their first appearance in 1908, they’ve become emblematic archetypes of eccentricity, folly, and friendship. And their misadventures-in gypsy caravans, stolen sports cars, and their Wild Wood-continue to capture readers’ imaginations and warm their hearts long after they grow up. Begun as a series of letters from Kenneth Grahame to his son, The Wind in the Willows is a timeless tale of animal cunning and human camaraderie. This Penguin Classics edition features an appendix of the letters in which Grahame first related the exploits of Toad.

(Goodreads)

I didn’t like this one too much. Of course, it is a classic children’s story – and I hear I liked it a lot when I was a kid – but right now it felt very slow-paced, and some of the chapters felt unnecessary. That is, of course, partly a rather charming detail that tells a lot about the time the book was published: “The Wayfarer” is about as important to The Wind in the Willows and the Tom Bombadil interlude is to The Lord of the Rings, and neither section would be printed today. It seems that in the first half of the 20th century relevance and progressing plot weren’t quite as important, at least not in Britain – could this have something to do with the tradition of serially published novels? I don’t know, but I’m inclined to think so, as also the Victorian novels seem to have these unnecessary bits that make me want to bang my head against the table. Well, not when I’m reading for enjoyment, but when I’m in a hurry and not particularly fond of the book it’s among the most annoying things.

The Wind in the Willows is very English in style, and the style is very similar to The Hobbit, or rather the other way around. The class distinctions and propaganda are clearly there, with the “good” animals representing the middle and upper classes, and the weasels and stoats standing in for the working class. My favourite character might be Mr Mole – he undergoes some delightful character development, unlike the other characters. He reminds me a little of Neville Longbottom.

First published: 1908

Pages: 207 (Oxford Children’s Classics 2008 edition)

Georgette Heyer: An Infamous Army

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In 1815, beneath the aegis of the Army of Occupation, Brussels is the gayest town in Europe. And the widow Lady Barbara Childe, renowned for being as outrageous as she is beautiful, is at the centre of all that is fashionable and light-hearted. When she meets Charles Audley, the elegant and handsome aide-de-camp to the great Duke of Wellington himself, her joie de vivre knows no bounds – until the eve of the fateful Battle of Waterloo…

(Back cover of Arrow Books edition)

As my initial plan was to write my thesis about things happening around the Battle of Waterloo, it was very natural to pick up this book of Heyer’s. I’d read The Spanish Bride before and was ready for the war descriptions, although in this book they definitely contain many more names and detailed information about the position of troops et cetera. If you’re completely unfamiliar with what went on during the battle, I advise you to do some light reading on it before starting, if just to acquaint yourself with the main personage and the leaders. This book is absolutely riddled with people who really existed, and I was at times bummed because I wasn’t sure if someone was real or fictional.

There are also characters from Heyer’s earlier books, including my favourites from The Devil’s Cub! I may have squealed in delight when I realised they were present.

Even more than with The Spanish Bride, this book contain two main storylines: the first one is the courtship of Barbara and Charles, and the other one, naturally, the war. They fit together admirably, although are still very clearly distinguishable from each other.

The prose is usual Heyer: Austen-esque, witty, and very flowing. As always, be prepared for long sentences. When you get used to it you don’t have to think after every comma, What does this refer to again? Trust me, it’s worth it.

First published: 1937

Pages:  427 (Arrow Books 2004 edition)

A. A. Milne: Winnie the Pooh

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To my surprise I really enjoyed Winnie the Pooh. It’s a pleasant read, easy to get through, and at times so accurate in its way of describing things I’m starting to feel disappointed I wasn’t introduced to it earlier in life. I’m even planning on getting my own copy, as particularly some of Eeyore’s scenes really made an impact on me. This, I think, is a very good children’s book. Easy, fun, and yet meaningful. Well done, Mr Milne – well done!

First published: 1926

Pages: 161 (E. P. Dutton 1998)

So that’s it.

Books bought:

I’ve bought a few books, but they haven’t arrived yet except for one: Wellington – Years of the Sword by Elizabeth Longford. I’ll take a picture of the books for next month!

Currently reading:

Sgt Dan Mills: Sniper One (Loving it so much)

I wish you all strength for the rest of the year – I know I’m stressed and can’t wait for the holidays!

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1 Comment

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One response to “Books in November ’12

  1. Just to let you know, I’ve nominated you for a peer-style blog award that invites you to share the love – check back to my blog for more details 🙂

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